THE TOUGHEST DECISION YOU MAY EVER MAKE - PICKING WHICH COLLEGE TO ATTEND

THE TOUGHEST DECISION YOU MAY EVER MAKE - PICKING WHICH COLLEGE TO ATTEND

You’ve researched and visited all your college choices. You have reach, target, and safety schools on your list. Some colleges have even sent you their financial award offers. May 1st is a few weeks away, and you may think you're ready to decide where to attend. Maybe so. First though, take the time to look at each college on your list from these four viewpoints. Your Brain If you did your homework when deciding where to apply, you already know that the colleges that accepted you meet your a....

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PARENTS APPEAR ASLEEP WHEN IT COMES TO COLLEGE COSTS - FINANCIAL ADVISORS NEED TO WAKE THEM UP

PARENTS APPEAR ASLEEP WHEN IT COMES TO COLLEGE COSTS - FINANCIAL ADVISORS NEED TO WAKE THEM UP

Decades ago, I financed my college education with a $2,000 loan and some help from their my parents. My cost to graduate from Ohio University in Athens, OH in 1972 was around $10,000. That’s $10,000 for four years of college! I keep bringing that up now with my “elderly” friends, as the cost of graduating from Ohio University today is well over $100,000, with an average of $32,000 in student debt. So what changed? Well, to be honest, colleges have changed. Even though colleges call them....

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IF THIS BILL PASSES, COLLEGE AFFORDABILITY WOULD GO FROM BAD TO WORSE, EXPERTS SAY

IF THIS BILL PASSES, COLLEGE AFFORDABILITY WOULD GO FROM BAD TO WORSE, EXPERTS SAY

House Republicans’ proposal would cut back loans, tighten repayment options and let for-profit colleges become 100 percent federally funded ASHINGTON — A bill proposed by Republicans in the House of Representatives could change the college-financing system dramatically, moving billions of dollars out of financial aid programs. If H.R. 4508, becomes law, college affordability would go from bad to worse, say many higher education experts, and students from low-income backgrounds would suffer....

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Princeton Review's 2018 College Hopes & Worries Survey

Princeton Review's 2018 College Hopes & Worries Survey

Every year the Princeton Review takes a survey that analyzes the hopes and worries of college-bound students and their parents. The 2018 report surveyed 10,958 families, 85% of which were students, and 15% parents. As expected the highest worries for both parents and students are paying for college (financial aid and debt); whereas just 12 years ago the biggest concern was getting into their top college choice. What is interesting in this report was the mindset difference between parents and st....

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